Dvca - How Do We Make It Better?

_Blackhawk_

Active Member
Fielding restrictions I think are a must with the one day games.

I'll ask this question again; did anyone really miss the lack of afternoon tea? I didn't, makes things easier on the home team and if you really want something for arvo tea, just bring it yourself. Take away some time from tea, so 10 minutes for tea, add that time deducted onto the drink breaks to allow; a drink, loo break or sunscreen etc.

If time is a worry, do what the juniors and T20 games do; bowl 5 from one end before swapping. Even for 2 day games, speed things up a little.

Keep the 12:30 start no matter what.
 
Fielding restrictions I think are a must with the one day games.

I'll ask this question again; did anyone really miss the lack of afternoon tea? I didn't, makes things easier on the home team and if you really want something for arvo tea, just bring it yourself. Take away some time from tea, so 10 minutes for tea, add that time deducted onto the drink breaks to allow; a drink, loo break or sunscreen etc.

If time is a worry, do what the juniors and T20 games do; bowl 5 from one end before swapping. Even for 2 day games, speed things up a little.

Keep the 12:30 start no matter what.
I think you’re right with the lunches.
Very rarely are you going to find a club that does them good these days.
 

_Blackhawk_

Active Member
I think we should go to 1 day 50 over games and 40 for below D grade. Start at 12:30 and to save time bowl 5 overs from one end before swapping. A bit more pressure on the batsman, a bit more exciting for the spectators, more opportunities to bat and bowlers might have to tighten up their lines and not bowl 3ft wide of off stump for the day like some teams practise.

Think about it; how many times do teams actually bat out 80? How many games do you get to 60 overs with wickets in hand? I would be interested to compare first innings scores between the one day season and a standard one. I'm willing to bet there isn't much difference. I do suppose that this is a product of me actually enjoying the one day season which I did not expect to be honest.
 

Warwick Todd

Active Member
I think we should go to 1 day 50 over games and 40 for below D grade. Start at 12:30 and to save time bowl 5 overs from one end before swapping. A bit more pressure on the batsman, a bit more exciting for the spectators, more opportunities to bat and bowlers might have to tighten up their lines and not bowl 3ft wide of off stump for the day like some teams practise.
It's hard to take this post seriously when it refers to spectators.

Toddy has played a lot of DVCA cricket. If spectators do bother turning up, its usually after 4pm for a few cans and a chat.

There'd be lucky to be 2 men and a dog watching before tea. I don't think the DVCA should consider spectators in any decisions they make.
 
I think we should go to 1 day 50 over games and 40 for below D grade. Start at 12:30 and to save time bowl 5 overs from one end before swapping. A bit more pressure on the batsman, a bit more exciting for the spectators, more opportunities to bat and bowlers might have to tighten up their lines and not bowl 3ft wide of off stump for the day like some teams practise.

Think about it; how many times do teams actually bat out 80? How many games do you get to 60 overs with wickets in hand? I would be interested to compare first innings scores between the one day season and a standard one. I'm willing to bet there isn't much difference. I do suppose that this is a product of me actually enjoying the one day season which I did not expect to be honest.
I agree that one day day cricket makes sense in lower grades logistically, however I'm a firm believer that the Shield grades should play as much two day cricket as possible. The main reasoning behind that being that the bowlers tend to become irrelevant in the one dayers, as they're limited to just eight overs each. The matches then become "bat-offs" with the batsman seeing the dangerous bowlers' off, knowing that they'll be able to cash in on the fourth and fifth bowlers' later in the piece.

In two day cricket you have your best bowlers operating on unlimited overs, which in turn leads to a far better contest between bat and ball. It's just a far better product overall.
 
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I agree that one day day cricket makes sense in lower grades logistically, however I'm a firm believer that the Shield grades should play as much two day cricket as possible. The main reasoning behind that being that the bowlers tend to become irrelevant in the one dayers, as they're limited to just eight overs each. The matches then become "bat-offs" with the batsman seeing the dangerous bowlers' off, knowing that they'll be able to cash in on the fourth and fifth bowlers' later in the piece.

In two day cricket you have your best bowlers operating with unlimited overs, which in turn leads to a far better contest between bat and ball. It's just a far better product overall.
This is the best take in a long time.
 

_Blackhawk_

Active Member
It's hard to take this post seriously when it refers to spectators.

Toddy has played a lot of DVCA cricket. If spectators do bother turning up, its usually after 4pm for a few cans and a chat.

There'd be lucky to be 2 men and a dog watching before tea. I don't think the DVCA should consider spectators in any decisions they make.
Toddy doesn't have a family? Come on even our lower grades get family members, our higher grades get family and usually retired players and social members. Shame if none of your club turns up.

100 overs in a day means 10 am start and 6.30 finish lot of ppl have work/junior sports in the morning not logistically convenient.
It might be a bit longer, but that's why you could reduce the amount of time between overs by bowling 5 from one end before swapping.
 

_Blackhawk_

Active Member
I agree that one day day cricket makes sense in lower grades logistically, however I'm a firm believer that the Shield grades should play as much two day cricket as possible. The main reasoning behind that being that the bowlers tend to become irrelevant in the one dayers, as they're limited to just eight overs each. The matches then become "bat-offs" with the batsman seeing the dangerous bowlers' off, knowing that they'll be able to cash in on the fourth and fifth bowlers' later in the piece.

In two day cricket you have your best bowlers operating with unlimited overs, which in turn leads to a far better contest between bat and ball. It's just a far better product overall.
Spoken like someone who's club has only 2 decent bowlers. Doesn't that just make all the other bowlers irrelevant if you're bowling two blokes for the majority of the innings?

A better product by who's standards? I would argue that if more players can be added to the competition with a one day comp, then wouldn't that be the "better product"?
 
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