SECA - 20/21 SEASON

winki pop

Active Member
Word on the street is that the new season will comprise of one day games only, with 14 rounds in the 8 team comps.
Will be very interesting to see how the grounds are prepared with the late start to the season.
 

CLOCKER

Active Member
Some tough to manage protocols being discussed for clubs to implement if the season gets started. Going to be very difficult for clubs to survive?
Bills have to be paid and if there are restrictions on social functions and after match gatherings it is going to put pressure on members with their subs, assuming any of them still have jobs.
 

Bumble

New Member
Bills have to be paid and if there are restrictions on social functions and after match gatherings it is going to put pressure on members with their subs, assuming any of them still have jobs.
There will be some very turbulent times ahead for some clubs as we approach the new season. The survival of many clubs will be undoubtedly be brought into question. The SECA administration must make changes to their competition with a focus on player participation and retention. Two day cricket looks like being a casualty with one day and 20/20 the vehicles to drive the season and potentially the competition long term. Let's hope the administration don't waste this opportunity to make long term beneficial changes to a competition in desperate need of a revamp.
 

winki pop

Active Member
There will be some very turbulent times ahead for some clubs as we approach the new season. The survival of many clubs will be undoubtedly be brought into question. The SECA administration must make changes to their competition with a focus on player participation and retention. Two day cricket looks like being a casualty with one day and 20/20 the vehicles to drive the season and potentially the competition long term. Let's hope the administration don't waste this opportunity to make long term beneficial changes to a competition in desperate need of a revamp.
Not too sure what you mean there Bumbly ???? The changes have been forced upon SECA and all comps due to the COVID situation. Of course clubs will suffer $$$$$$ if they cannot operate functions and after match beverages. The top two grades will be decided by clubs voting for 1 of 2 options, so there could be still a mixture of one day and two games. All other grades will be one dayers, which under the circumstances should be ok and easier to manage from a cricket clubs players point of view. Not sure if there will be a separate 20/20 comp at this stage, but looks unlikely. Long Term ????? and in desperate need of a re-vamp ????? Not sure about that, they have made significant changes down from 12, to 10, and now 8 team grades over the last couple of seasons which has resulted in more even and competitive cricket.
 

Bumble

New Member
Not too sure what you mean there Bumbly ???? The changes have been forced upon SECA and all comps due to the COVID situation. Of course clubs will suffer $$$$$$ if they cannot operate functions and after match beverages. The top two grades will be decided by clubs voting for 1 of 2 options, so there could be still a mixture of one day and two games. All other grades will be one dayers, which under the circumstances should be ok and easier to manage from a cricket clubs players point of view. Not sure if there will be a separate 20/20 comp at this stage, but looks unlikely. Long Term ????? and in desperate need of a re-vamp ????? Not sure about that, they have made significant changes down from 12, to 10, and now 8 team grades over the last couple of seasons which has resulted in more even and competitive cricket.
I agree Winki Pop that changes have definitely been forced upon SECA and the cricket community and I am not denying that. What I am saying, is that this is the opportunity for SECA to make some creative and sustainable long-term changes that are reflective of a changing society. For a long time now, clubs have been scrambling to find players to fill their starting XI's. Yes, an 8 team competition is a good initiative however, as I see it, it is a stronger reflection of the quality and availability of community cricketers. Let's not forget that it took the SECA an awful long time to activate this change; their hand was forced and they were by no means, pioneers. The reality is that two day cricket does not encourage player participation and starving cricketers of the opportunity to practice their batting or bowling for potentially a period of nearly a month, does not encourage player retention. Unfortunately, I feel that two-day cricket is from a bygone era and its future must be looked at moving forward, certainly at a community level. As I mentioned, one-day and 20/20 cricket are outstanding vehicles to drive the game forward and what we all want are increased opportunities with both bat and ball in a post COVID world. Heaven knows we've missed it.
 

winki pop

Active Member
I agree Winki Pop that changes have definitely been forced upon SECA and the cricket community and I am not denying that. What I am saying, is that this is the opportunity for SECA to make some creative and sustainable long-term changes that are reflective of a changing society. For a long time now, clubs have been scrambling to find players to fill their starting XI's. Yes, an 8 team competition is a good initiative however, as I see it, it is a stronger reflection of the quality and availability of community cricketers. Let's not forget that it took the SECA an awful long time to activate this change; their hand was forced and they were by no means, pioneers. The reality is that two day cricket does not encourage player participation and starving cricketers of the opportunity to practice their batting or bowling for potentially a period of nearly a month, does not encourage player retention. Unfortunately, I feel that two-day cricket is from a bygone era and its future must be looked at moving forward, certainly at a community level. As I mentioned, one-day and 20/20 cricket are outstanding vehicles to drive the game forward and what we all want are increased opportunities with both bat and ball in a post COVID world. Heaven knows we've missed it.
Bumble, some fair points relating to the slowness of SECA to implement any relevant changes but i disagree totally with your views on 2 day cricket. Perhaps the changes to more one day hit and giggle stuff for the lower 11's might be easier for clubs to gain interest, but certainly not for their 1's and 2's. Developing young players to further their abilities is not conducive to 40, 50 over games, as in some cases if they bat in the middle may not even get a hit if the top order gets going and then when they do get a chance they probably have to get on with the business. Bowling wise, 8 to 10 overs max is also not going to help, where bye in 2 day cricket they could bowl 20 in two spells. Isn't the aim to provide opportunities to go as high as possible with their cricket, learn to build an innings, bowl with plans and tie up ends to force mistakes etc etc. You've only got to look at the English second tier cricket to see that the shorter version of the game doesn't cut it with their development, all they do is play 50 over stuff and end up not being able to cope in the longer versions. I've seen plenty of poms come out and not adapt to our 72, 80, or 90 over two day games due to this factor. Any first or seconds cricketers love the game and are most of the times good players, and enjoy the challenges of two day cricket. The one day and 20/20 versions are there for stimulating and having a varied season as well as some fun. Premier and first class cricket will be always be the longer versions, so we need to maintain that down in Local comps.
 

Bumble

New Member
Bumble, some fair points relating to the slowness of SECA to implement any relevant changes but i disagree totally with your views on 2 day cricket. Perhaps the changes to more one day hit and giggle stuff for the lower 11's might be easier for clubs to gain interest, but certainly not for their 1's and 2's. Developing young players to further their abilities is not conducive to 40, 50 over games, as in some cases if they bat in the middle may not even get a hit if the top order gets going and then when they do get a chance they probably have to get on with the business. Bowling wise, 8 to 10 overs max is also not going to help, where bye in 2 day cricket they could bowl 20 in two spells. Isn't the aim to provide opportunities to go as high as possible with their cricket, learn to build an innings, bowl with plans and tie up ends to force mistakes etc etc. You've only got to look at the English second tier cricket to see that the shorter version of the game doesn't cut it with their development, all they do is play 50 over stuff and end up not being able to cope in the longer versions. I've seen plenty of poms come out and not adapt to our 72, 80, or 90 over two day games due to this factor. Any first or seconds cricketers love the game and are most of the times good players, and enjoy the challenges of two day cricket. The one day and 20/20 versions are there for stimulating and having a varied season as well as some fun. Premier and first class cricket will be always be the longer versions, so we need to maintain that down in Local comps.
Love the debate, Winki!
 

CLOCKER

Active Member
Clubs will probably have to accept that there may not be any cricket this season. I suspect Andrews will keep up the restrictions until the end of November or early December until these Covid numbers come down to under 5 per day. Assuming this is the time frame clubs still have to contact players, organise training for a couple of weeks, find out what teams they can get together have all of the required committee meetings etc etc. Then we hit the XMAS break. Best case scenario, would be that the comp can start in January and play 12 matches or perhaps organise double headers for a couple of weekends.

Then we have the Covid distancing rules which will come into play for off field staff and ensuring there are no outbreaks b/c of contaminated water bottles etc.

The GF should be played over a best of three series since they are going to be one day matches. Either way it is going to be a very different season, and not sure too many players will be happy about playing just one dayers.
 

winki pop

Active Member
Clubs will probably have to accept that there may not be any cricket this season. I suspect Andrews will keep up the restrictions until the end of November or early December until these Covid numbers come down to under 5 per day. Assuming this is the time frame clubs still have to contact players, organise training for a couple of weeks, find out what teams they can get together have all of the required committee meetings etc etc. Then we hit the XMAS break. Best case scenario, would be that the comp can start in January and play 12 matches or perhaps organise double headers for a couple of weekends.

Then we have the Covid distancing rules which will come into play for off field staff and ensuring there are no outbreaks b/c of contaminated water bottles etc.

The GF should be played over a best of three series since they are going to be one day matches. Either way it is going to be a very different season, and not sure too many players will be happy about playing just one dayers.
Clocker, suggest that you review the CV Covid guide lines and adjudicate more intently as there are so many more issues for clubs to sort out on top of what you've glossed over. SECA not supporting clubs with financial assistance doesn't help, they've effectively passed the batten to clubs to work it out. They have suggested that they will discount affiliation fees but haven't as yet advised clubs about the reduction which doesn't help clubs who are working through their costs. The covid costs alone could see clubs in financial ruin for years, by which they may not even recover. There are rumors of some clubs reassessing their situation which may include not participating this season. Interesting times ahead.
 

CLOCKER

Active Member
Clocker, suggest that you review the CV Covid guide lines and adjudicate more intently as there are so many more issues for clubs to sort out on top of what you've glossed over. SECA not supporting clubs with financial assistance doesn't help, they've effectively passed the batten to clubs to work it out. They have suggested that they will discount affiliation fees but haven't as yet advised clubs about the reduction which doesn't help clubs who are working through their costs. The covid costs alone could see clubs in financial ruin for years, by which they may not even recover. There are rumors of some clubs reassessing their situation which may include not participating this season. Interesting times ahead.
Wow wasn't aware of the depth of the issues...You mean that some clubs will be forced to actually develop kids and promote from within instead of spending $10-15K on mercenaries? Shocking, absolutely shocking.
 

CLOCKER

Active Member
I saw on Leader cricket that Mackie had 3 internationals last season that aren't returning. That will save them some $s I would think.
Without those recruits they will not win a game. Unless they get an influx of players from somewhere else they just don't have the players or the depth at their club to compete.
 
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