Renewables Versus Fossil Fuels.

baggygreen man

also known as Richie
Staff member
This is something close to my heart as I look ahead for a cleaner future for my children's children and theirs. As we move well into the 21st century we humans have to start thinking about our future energy needs. . What will run our industries, homes and transport over the coming decades and beyond. Do we want to continue to dirty our atmosphere by using fossil fuels or do we want to breath clean air by transferring to renewable energies? Comments.
 

baggygreen man

also known as Richie
Staff member
I am not that naive to suggest that the planet can go to 100% renewables overnite. It needs to be a measured approach between reducing fossil fuel usage and introducing more renewable fuels. Only this week the Australian government announced a major push for gas exploration and production to replace an aging coal fired plant earmarked for decommission in 2022. Its aim is to make existing hi CO2 emission fossil fuels such as gas cleaner by using carbon capture technology. The other big story is the governments push to establish a regional hydrogen export hub from gas-produced hydrogen coupled with carbon capture and storage. So while Australia has an eye to the future it is essential for our economy that we continue to milk the bounty from existing fossil fuel production and export.
 

Signman

also known as Mal
yeah mate, we don't want to continue to pollute the world - as you say it's going to be gradual process to convert to the cleaner & safer fuel... the sooner we can get to that goal the better, especially with us having to deal with the coronavirus factor as well.
 

baggygreen man

also known as Richie
Staff member
Researchers from RMIT have successfully harnessed hydrogen using biosolids and biogas..by-products from wastewater treatment.

The patented technology uses a special material derived from the by products that sparks a chemical reaction.
The process means all materials needed for hydrogen production could be sourced on-site at a wastewater treatment plant, without the need for expensive catalysts.

The technology also traps the carbon found in biosolids and biogas, which could in future enable a near zero-emission wastewater sector.
 

baggygreen man

also known as Richie
Staff member
Australian company Sun Cable plans to develop the world's largest solar farm with the purpose of exporting clean energy to both Australia and South East Asia.. The $20 billion project the Australia-ASEAN Power Link (AAPL), is being backed by Atlassian's Mike Cannon-Brookes and Fortescue Metal's Andrew Forrest and will be built on the vast Northern Territory cattle station Newcastle Waters . The end game of the project is to supply renewable electricity to both the NT and then via a 4,500-kilometre undersea cable to the ASEAN nations..primarily Singapore and Indonesia.

The AAPL which is estimated to take between 5/7 years to develop and implement will integrate three technology groups - the world’s largest battery, the world’s largest solar farm, and the high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission cable from a solar/storage facility to the NT and onto South East Asia connecting Australia into the ASEAN Power Grid. Before work commences on the ambitious project Sun Cable needs environmental approval from the NT Government.
 
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baggygreen man

also known as Richie
Staff member
Yeah, it does mate... but I suppose in the 70's we probably would not have believed they would have all this great technology they have today.
Definitely. Kinda proud that Australia is now embracing future technology and occasionally showing the way. When you think about it Mal, utilising the sun is a no brainer given a good part of the Oz interior can get so hot you can fry an egg on your car's bonnet.
 
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Signman

also known as Mal
The Aussie technology is very impressive Richie... got to take advantage of the sun.

Aussie is more humid than NZ - in NZ though the heat from the sun can be absolutely brutal, at times it feels like it could burn a hole in your skull... I remember when we played a cricket test against England, it started at 11am & about an hour later the Barmy Army supporters looked a very similar colour to our orange lobster crayfish 😁
 
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baggygreen man

also known as Richie
Staff member
The Aussie technology is very impressive Richie... got to take advantage of the sun.

Aussie is more humid than NZ - in NZ though the heat from the sun can be absolutely brutal, at times it feels like it could burn a hole in your skull... I remember when we played a cricket test against England, it started at 11am & about an hour later the Barmy Army supporters looked a very similar colour to our orange lobster crayfish 😁
😆
 
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